“A haunting read”

A new review of Colin O'Sullivan's novel The Starved Lover Sings by Marvin Minkler of Modern First Editions: Colin O'Sullivan is one of the most remarkable and original writers currently turning out one outstanding novel after another. Killarney Blues was the author's debut, which won the French Prix Mystère de la Critique, followed by The … Continue reading “A haunting read”

“Novels are all about commitment” – Colin O’Sullivan’s profile in Books Ireland Magazine

Meet a writer who "has an understanding of the power of words, their placing, their specific meaning" and "reflects the current malaise and modern preoccupations", "sends language out on a gleeful spree, exuberant, defiant", and who is "one of the finest storytellers out there, a lyrical master of the written word".

More praise for “The Dark Manual”

Review published on Book Nudge / Book Noir, August 31, 2018. The Dark Manual defies easy categorisation; it’s a literary novel, a very desperate tale of love and loss, a noir thriller, of real and imaginary threats and a sci-fi speculation (which could be read as prescient future gazing). O’Sullivan has carved himself a distinct … Continue reading More praise for “The Dark Manual”

A glorious review of Colin O’Sullivan’s new novel “The Dark Manual”

Isaac Asimov had Three Laws of Robotics: 1. A robot may not injure a human being, or through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. 2. A robot must obey orders given it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. 3. A robot must protect its own … Continue reading A glorious review of Colin O’Sullivan’s new novel “The Dark Manual”

Colin O’Sullivan wins the “Prix Mystère de la critique” in France for “Killarney Blues”

Congratulations to Colin O'Sullivan, Winner of a prestigious crime fiction award in France: the Prix Mystère de la critique! Previous winners include: Don Winslow, Daniel Woodrell, Dennis Lehane, Boris Akunin, Donald E. Westlake, Henning Mankell, James Ellroy, Michael Connelly, Thomas Harris, and many other fabulous writers from around the world.

The Success of the French Edition of “Killarney Blues”

"Carried by a genuine writing talent, Killarney Blues is a Noir novel full of melancholy and unfulfilled dreams with a surprising glimmer of hope at the end. Without the slightest naivety. A revelation."  —Le Soir “A cathartic novel that ultimately creates positive emotions, like the blues can do. Poignant.” —booknode.com ­­ “A luminous novel that … Continue reading The Success of the French Edition of “Killarney Blues”

Killarney Blues – Colin O’Sullivan

A wonderful review of the French edition of Colin O’Sullivan’s KILLARNEY BLUES!

Mille (et une) lectures de Maeve

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Traduit par Ludivine Bouton-Kelly

Bernard est jarvey dans la petite ville de Killarney, en Irlande, dans le comté du Kerry. Si vous connaissez Killarney, vous avez sûrement rencontré ces conducteurs de calèche qui promènent toute la journée les nombreux touristes. Pourtant Bernard est mis au ban de la bourgade : il est considéré un peu comme l’idiot du village. On découvre qu’il aurait peut-être une forme d’autisme Asperger (mais cela reste une supposition). Cet homme a une passion : le blues. Dès qu’il peut, il gratte sa guitare et chante (mais chez lui). Il est incollable sur tous les bluesmen américains. Une passion que lui a transmise son père, décédé. Bernard est amoureux depuis son adolescence de Marian, à qui il envoie régulièrement des cassettes de ses enregistrements.

Quand s’ouvre le récit, Bernard se fait rosser par des hommes, à la sortie d’un pub. On ne sait pas pourquoi. Des…

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New release: A wildly original cautionary tale from Colin O’Sullivan

The Starved Lover Sings Fall under the spell of Colin O'Sullivan's distinctive narrative voice. O'Sullivan's writing is striking. Admire the at once precise and experimental nature of his prose, its energy and daring. Enjoy it despite its darkness – and be impressed with it.   For bloggers and reviewers: please contact us to receive a … Continue reading New release: A wildly original cautionary tale from Colin O’Sullivan

Fionnuala Brennan: Writing about Goya

I have long been fascinated by the charismatic artist Francisco de Goya. The seeds of my fascination with this Spanish painter were sown during my studies in History of Art in Trinity College, Dublin. The firework that sent me into orbit to write the novel, The Painter’s Women: Goya in Light and Shade, was a … Continue reading Fionnuala Brennan: Writing about Goya

KILLARNEY BLUES to be published in France

We are happy to announce the first (of many, no doubt!) translation rights sale for Colin O'Sullivan's novel KILLARNEY BLUES. French translation rights have been acquired by the legendary publisher of Rivages François Guérif. The novel will be translated by Jean-Paul Gratias, the no-less-legendary translator of James Ellroy and William Kotzwinkle, among others. "Marvellous novel, endearing, … Continue reading KILLARNEY BLUES to be published in France

Film director Charlie McCarthy launching Fionnuala Brennan’s novel THE PAINTER’S WOMEN

We would like to share Charlie McCarthy’s thoughtful and quirky speech at the launch of The Painter’s Women last night with those who couldn’t attend. Enjoy! "The Painter’s Women is told from six different perspectives so I thought I might say six different things about Fionnuala’s novel and my experience of reading it. (Relax — … Continue reading Film director Charlie McCarthy launching Fionnuala Brennan’s novel THE PAINTER’S WOMEN

Writing, reading, music, and “far-awayness”. David Hogan interviews Colin O’Sullivan

David Hogan: You're in the long tradition of writers leaving Ireland in order to write about it.  Is there something unique about the country that pushes you away while at the same time drawing you back? Colin O’Sullivan: The Irish have always been a migrant race as you know, for many reasons too long to … Continue reading Writing, reading, music, and “far-awayness”. David Hogan interviews Colin O’Sullivan

From “The Angel of the Streetlamps” by Sean Moncrieff

                   30 - Michael Bourke I opt to meet her in the office, not the house. The church had to be re-opened anyway: outrageously selfish of me to have kept it closed. I also hope to project a more officious nature, surrounded by the trappings of ecclesiastical power. Not to impress the journalist – she … Continue reading From “The Angel of the Streetlamps” by Sean Moncrieff

“From the menial, I’ll build meaning.”

Why I Write by Jackie Mallon The sound is like a low growl. You mightn’t hear it but even when I look at peace, I’m making it. Then I itch and scrape. Is my stomach empty? Do I need a walk? A nap? A blanket? Kibble? Tranquilizing? Reading, yes, that calms me. For a while. … Continue reading “From the menial, I’ll build meaning.”