DEATH IN THE FACE: THE STRANGE LIFE & DEATH OF YUKIO MISHIMA

Craig McDonald about Yukio Mishima, one of the characters in his latest Hector Lassiter novel, Death in the Face: "Yukio Mishima (born Kimitake Hiraoka) was a gifted novelist and one of Japan’s great literary figures. He was a true renaissance man who composed nearly three dozen novels, nearly as many books of essays, more than … Continue reading DEATH IN THE FACE: THE STRANGE LIFE & DEATH OF YUKIO MISHIMA

“A quixotic endeavour with an unclear goal”. Colin O’Sullivan interviews David Hogan.

    Colin O’Sullivan:   The Last Island covers important issues like “environmentalism, animal rights, and the costs of capitalism”.  What made you want to write about these issues? David Hogan: I believe that these are among the paramount issues of our time, and that our responses to them will shape the future. So it would’ve … Continue reading “A quixotic endeavour with an unclear goal”. Colin O’Sullivan interviews David Hogan.

Writing, reading, music, and “far-awayness”. David Hogan interviews Colin O’Sullivan

David Hogan: You're in the long tradition of writers leaving Ireland in order to write about it.  Is there something unique about the country that pushes you away while at the same time drawing you back? Colin O’Sullivan: The Irish have always been a migrant race as you know, for many reasons too long to … Continue reading Writing, reading, music, and “far-awayness”. David Hogan interviews Colin O’Sullivan

COMING TOMORROW: “PRINT THE LEGEND”, THE DEFINITIVE EDITION

"Ernest Hemingway wrote, “All stories, if continued far enough, end in death.” It’s possible Hemingway’s 1961 death by shotgun blast was something other than the suicide history records. My new novel, Print the Legend, explores Hemingway’s demise: one of the most infamous of American authors’ deaths. Given its violent circumstances, it may also be the most unjustly under-investigated." Continue reading … Continue reading COMING TOMORROW: “PRINT THE LEGEND”, THE DEFINITIVE EDITION

“A Blooming Good Read”: Jackie Mallon about reading

"I should mention I have no method to my reading. If I had, I would waste less time on unworthy books (ah yes, The Goldfinch…) Currently I’ve chosen well. I am revisiting the illicit charms of Lady Chatterley’s Lover which I read in my early teens probably concealed behind a copy of Smash Hits magazine. … Continue reading “A Blooming Good Read”: Jackie Mallon about reading

Richard Kalich: How I Write

I don't have a method but... and it’s a big ‘but’... I can speak of a pattern that has repeated itself with all four of my novels. And the same will be true with my next. I see my novels metaphorically. By that I mean an image comes to me... and that image, that poetic metaphoric image, contains all I need … Continue reading Richard Kalich: How I Write

Craig McDonald: “Why I write: One true sentence.”

Why I Write A while back, the wonderful Jen Forbus was collecting six-word memoirs from various crime and thriller writers. The exercise was inspired, she wrote, by the line attributed to Ernest Hemingway (a frequent supporting character in my Hector Lassiter novels) that resulted from a challenge to craft an über short story. The result, … Continue reading Craig McDonald: “Why I write: One true sentence.”

Why do I write? by David Hogan

Why do I write? I write because I am a prisoner. I write because there exists, beyond the walls of my preconceptions and just outside the barriers of my inventiveness, another story. It’s not wholly personal or cultural or factual. It’s not religious or utopian. Nor is it political. It’s all of these things, or … Continue reading Why do I write? by David Hogan

Flanagan’s Booker win a breath of fresh air

About the Booker winner Richard Flanagan who highlighted the struggle writers face to make a living from their craft

Donald Finnaeus Mayo

images-3 Man Booker Prize Winner Richard Flanagan

There was something particularly heartening about Richard Flanagan’s Booker Prize win for his novel “The Narrow Road to the Deep North”. Here is a writer at the top of his game, receiving one of the most coveted literary awards in the English speaking language, admitting that on completing the book he almost gave up writing to work in the mines of northern Australia so he could support his family.

Although I’ve never met Richard Flanagan, I’ve followed his career, not without a touch of envy, for a number of years. I first came across his work when I was in Tasmania back in the 1990s working on an early draft of a novel I was writing. I was out on some wilderness tracks in the far western part of the state bushwalking with my cousin and some friends, some of whom knew Flanagan from…

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