A review of REACH THE SHINING RIVER by the winner of our Christmas Prize Draw

"'It was Wardell found the body.' Kansas City, 1935. Emmett Watson, a county prosecutor of Irish decent, is married to Fay, a high society woman, who is the daughter of one of the movers and shakers in the city, and unhappy in her marriage. At a closed-door meeting with his father-in-law, and other high rollers, Emmett is … Continue reading A review of REACH THE SHINING RIVER by the winner of our Christmas Prize Draw

The Success of the French Edition of “Killarney Blues”

"Carried by a genuine writing talent, Killarney Blues is a Noir novel full of melancholy and unfulfilled dreams with a surprising glimmer of hope at the end. Without the slightest naivety. A revelation."  —Le Soir “A cathartic novel that ultimately creates positive emotions, like the blues can do. Poignant.” —booknode.com ­­ “A luminous novel that … Continue reading The Success of the French Edition of “Killarney Blues”

Writing, reading, music, and “far-awayness”. David Hogan interviews Colin O’Sullivan

David Hogan: You're in the long tradition of writers leaving Ireland in order to write about it.  Is there something unique about the country that pushes you away while at the same time drawing you back? Colin O’Sullivan: The Irish have always been a migrant race as you know, for many reasons too long to … Continue reading Writing, reading, music, and “far-awayness”. David Hogan interviews Colin O’Sullivan

New cover art for REACH THE SHINING RIVER

   Cover art: Keith Mallett Cover design: JT Lindroos We hope you would agree that this is a striking new cover for Kevin Stevens' novel REACH THE SHINING RIVER, with its soundtrack of jazz and blues. The lady on the cover is, of course, Arlene Gray, wonderfully described in this reader's review: "Arlene cleans hotel … Continue reading New cover art for REACH THE SHINING RIVER

Colin O’Sullivan on Random pointless questions from rock music obsessives

Colin O' Sullivan

 Like the character of Bernard in my debut novel, Killarney Blues, many of my friends are music obsessives, the kind of people who wouldn’t be out of place in Nick Hornby’s High Fidelity.

These cardigan-wearers (to which I am a fully fledged and flouting member) often fire out pointless emails asking all kinds of random music questions. These have been happening for years, and the sad fact is that I have begun to cherish the arrival of these useless inquisitions.

Below are an example of some of the kinds of questions my muso buddies like to ask, and my deeply considered answers (we’re talking hours people, days). Please note also that these answers are liable to change. For example, when recently asked about my favourite Bowie album I instinctively answered Low, but on the following day could just have easily said Station to Station or Hunky Dory. Such is the kind…

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Book Review: Killarney Blues by Colin O’Sullivan

Thoughtful and beautiful review of KILLARNEY BLUES

Love, Sex & Other Dirty Words

The sun on the lake sparkles. Only a laden, dark cloud in the distance has the audacity to ruin the perfect picture. Bernard has one eye on it, knows how things loom, how those clouds can hover, then open and pour, drench, saturate. But not yet. There’s a few more hours of this brightness, and he’s intent on enjoying it.

He’s very happy to be sitting out in it with this pretty American by his side: Laura. Laura from Texas. Blue-eyed. Bouncy. Beautiful. They both sit on the edge of the main pier and stare out at the lake, the sound of gentle lapping under their feet. It’s almost idyllic. So many scenes like this can be found in spots all over Killarney. Some famous, well-trodden places. Some hidden treasures that await discovery.

This is just one of the frequented runs, but yes, it is, for the most part, an…

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