Three Chords and the Truth – Review

The Venetian Vase

Hector Lassiter is one of the most compelling literary creations of recent years– a crime novelist who ‘writes what he lives and lives what he writes’. Lassiter was born January 1, 1900, and he witnesses some of the most tumultuous events of the twentieth century. Whether he finds himself at the heart of a murder mystery with the Lost Generation in 1920s Paris, or dodging the bombs and bullets with Ernest Hemingway during the Spanish Civil War, Lassiter is never far away from violence and intrigue. Three Chords and the Truth is the ninth and final novel in the Lassiter series, and, needless to say,  it was eagerly anticipated by the many fans of the series.

Craig McDonald is the author behind the author, the creator of Hector Lassiter and the writer of five more novels outside the Lassiter series. McDonald began his career as a journalist and still works in that…

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“Three Chords & The Truth Rings True Like a Finely Tuned Guitar”

A wonderful review by a true connaisseur: Three Chords & The Truth Rings True Like a Finely Tuned Guitar, December 18, 2016 By Marvin Minkler This review is from: Three Chords & The Truth: A Hector Lassiter novel (Volume 10) (Paperback) The first Hector Lassiter novel I read was the Edgar-nominated debut from Craig McDonald, … Continue reading “Three Chords & The Truth Rings True Like a Finely Tuned Guitar”

An unmissable book at an unbeatable price

Bring New York on holidays with you with this August promotion of Richard Kalich's Central Park West Trilogy : it's only £0.99 on Amazon UK until the end of the month! *** – So we are going to do this like a courtroom drama, or an interrogation? – Yes. We are. We are indeed. – Why? – Because most … Continue reading An unmissable book at an unbeatable price

First endorsement for Patricia Ketola’s debut novel

"From Orson Welles’ F Is For Fake to Alan Rudolph’s The Moderns, I’ve always adored works of fiction centered on the concept of art forgery. I’m also a goner for strong narrative voice. Patricia Ketola’s clever and sexy debut novel is an audacious genre mash-up, elevated and enlivened by the salty, up-from-the-heels voice of narrator … Continue reading First endorsement for Patricia Ketola’s debut novel

Five-star review of DEATH IN THE FACE by Craig McDonald

Death in the Face (Hector Lassiter Novel #9) by Craig McDonald I loved traveling with author Hector Lassiter, his fellow friend Ian Fleming, and his devastating companion along the way, Haven Branch. Felt like I was right there with them on the planes and trains and in the restaurants, cafés and clubs. Combining writing, spying, … Continue reading Five-star review of DEATH IN THE FACE by Craig McDonald

DEATH IN THE FACE on a “Holiday Wish List” in BookList

Booklist Feature Article She Reads: Holiday Wish Lists Stover, Kaite Mediatore (author) "Dear Santa, I’m not going to bore you with an annual report of my behavior—virtuous or villainous. Suffice to say I was a very good reader, and I’d like some more, please. For my holiday reading, I hope I find these books under … Continue reading DEATH IN THE FACE on a “Holiday Wish List” in BookList

Publishers Weekly review of DEATH IN THE FACE

"Set in 1962, McDonald's fine ninth Hector Lassiter novel (after Print the Legend) takes the 62-year-old writer and an old friend of his, 54-year-old Ian Fleming (the creator of James Bond), to Japan. Ostensibly, Fleming is to do research for an Asian-set 007 novel, and Lassiter is covering Fleming's trip for Playboy magazine. In fact, … Continue reading Publishers Weekly review of DEATH IN THE FACE

DEATH IN THE FACE on the “Favorite Crime Fiction of 2015” list in The Rap Sheet

• Death in the Face, by Craig McDonald (Betimes): Those of us who inhale the Hector Lassiter series (starting with 2007’s Edgar-nominated Head Games) enjoyed a big year in 2014, so it was fair to expect that 2015 might be a bit on the quiet side. Happily, this was not the case, as McDonald released … Continue reading DEATH IN THE FACE on the “Favorite Crime Fiction of 2015” list in The Rap Sheet

5* GoodReads review of BORDERLAND NOIR

"Noir & crime fans, BORDERLAND NOIR will drag you over the border & steep you in sweat, beer, fear, revenge, smoke, jalapeños and blood. Short stories, novel excerpts, thoughtful pondering on the drug war and its multifaceted aspects (and casualties), and some stellar essays. An eye-opening read about life in the shady world of the … Continue reading 5* GoodReads review of BORDERLAND NOIR

Review of Sean Moncrieff’s “The Angel of the Streetlamps”

What if politics wasn’t such a cynical business, dedicated to perpetuating power dynamics and maintaining the status quo, while talking ceaselessly about progress and change? That’s the situation Sean Moncrieff dares to dream up in his fascinating novel The Angel of the Streetlamps. A woman falls to her death from a high window on a … Continue reading Review of Sean Moncrieff’s “The Angel of the Streetlamps”

Review of Craig McDonald’s DEATH IN THE FACE by Les Edgerton

This latest in Craig McDonald’s Hector Lassiter series—Death in the Face--is perhaps his finest. It’s my fervent hope that this isn’t the last in this wonderful series!   Like all the previous books in this series, McDonald sheds light on some of the most important literary figures of the past near-century on a personal level … Continue reading Review of Craig McDonald’s DEATH IN THE FACE by Les Edgerton

A fabulous review of Craig McDonald’s TOROS & TORSOS

"I would highly recommend TOROS & TORSOS as a gripping and compulsive mystery, and one of the best novels I have come across to explore how an art movement is defined by its time and setting. But if the surrealists were to be believed, art defines its time and setting." Read the full text here: … Continue reading A fabulous review of Craig McDonald’s TOROS & TORSOS

If you haven’t read Richard Kalich yet, this should convince you to start

An American Master ***** Richard Kalich is an American novelist who creates brilliant and accomplished works of fiction that deal with themes of cruelty and obsession . Although Kalich’s work is informed by the earlier works of the European avant garde, his exploration of the current era is as American and up-to-date as the latest … Continue reading If you haven’t read Richard Kalich yet, this should convince you to start

Some like to listen dangerously…

                           Readergal from Booklist about the voice of Hector Lassiter: Lust for Listening Readergal has quite a few invisible boyfriends who talk to her. She has complete control over when they speak and what they talk about. And she has one for almost every … Continue reading Some like to listen dangerously…

New review! SILK FOR THE FEED DOGS: “full of life and personality”

A fun look at the fashion world, March 25, 2015 By Trent P. McDonald “Silk for the Feed Dogs”, a novel by Jackie Mallon, follows Irish farmer’s daughter Kat Connelly as she works her way through the fashion world from the “fashion” house of a bottom feeder in London to the top of high fashion … Continue reading New review! SILK FOR THE FEED DOGS: “full of life and personality”

A new review of David Hogan​’s novel THE LAST ISLAND

  ****The Last Island Review by Victoria Weisfeld "I can’t remember what circuitous path of weblinks took me to David Hogan’s website, but it looked interesting enough that I ordered his book. Unlike a best-seller or a famous author about whose work the reader starts with a set of assumptions, I knew nada about Hogan … Continue reading A new review of David Hogan​’s novel THE LAST ISLAND

Review of Richard Kalich’s Penthouse F

Colin O’Sullivan about PENTHOUSE-F by Richard Kalich

Colin O' Sullivan

– So we are going to do this like a courtroom drama, or an interrogation?

– Yes. We are. We are indeed.

– Why?

– Because most of the book is done in that style.

–  I see. Was the book impressive?

– Yes, very impressive. Mr. Kalich is a great writer.

– And he appears in the book too?

– Yes, if it really is him, if you know what I mean…you can call the book postmodern, or that he uses meta-narratives or…

– That all sounds a bit confusing.

– In theory yes, but it’s a very entertaining book. Says a lot about writing. And the creative process. It’s playful, but not flippant. We’re dealing with a serious artist here.

– Oh, really?

– “He’s an idiot. So disconnected . . . conflicted . . . torn apart.”

– What?

– Just joking. That’s actually a quote from the book. He often sidesteps you like that. Reminds you of…

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Colin O’Sullivan’s review of THE NIHILESTHETE by Richard Kalich

Colin O' Sullivan

Review of The Nihilesthete, by Richard Kalich (Betimes Books)

When social-worker Haberman finds a limbless wheelchair-bound man observing a street artist, it’s as if all his birthdays have come at once. He can now set about the task that he may always have been destined for, to take this unfortunate victim under his monstrous wing and systematically abuse him (mentally and spiritually) until he is somehow sated.

 

Why does he do this? What unfortunate events in his past have compelled him to carry out such atrocities? Wrong question. It’s like asking how Winnie got buried in sand in Beckett’s “Happy Days”: the fact is that she just happens to be buried in sand; the fact is that Haberman just happens to be this way, like Simenon’s Frank Friedermaier in Dirty Snow perhaps, bad to the bone. Those looking for easy armchair-psychology rationalizations have come to the wrong anti-hero.

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“CENTRAL PARK WEST TRILOGY is not your average novel.”

"...wrought with dark humour and a multitude of literary, philosophical and psychological references. The trilogy is an essential read for anyone who enjoys a challenge: predictable neither in content nor in form, CENTRAL PARK WEST TRILOGY is not your average novel." Full review here: http://www.palatinate.org.uk/?p=52129 Richard Kalich's book is on promotion in the UK and … Continue reading “CENTRAL PARK WEST TRILOGY is not your average novel.”

Praise for the opening line of HEAD GAMES by Craig McDonald

"From a much newer novel, Head Games by Craig McDonald, the first line is: “We were sitting in a backroom of a cantina on the outskirts of Ciudad Juarez, three drinks in, when Bill Wade reached into the dusty duffle bag he had tucked under the table and plunked down the Mexican general’s head.” The … Continue reading Praise for the opening line of HEAD GAMES by Craig McDonald