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Posts tagged ‘Les Edgerton’

Christmas nostalgia : Our authors about the best book gift they have ever received (Part 2)

December 13, 2017

BetimesBooksNow

Patricia Ketola, author of Dirty Pictures

One Christmas, when I was about ten years old, I received a copy of R. L. Stevenson’s Treasure Island. The book was an unusual choice for a little girl, but I was so thrilled by the marvellous tale of adventure that I could not put it down.  Jim Hawkins and Long John Silver captured my imagination and I wanted to join them on the high seas and participate in their quest for treasure. Treasure Island is such a vivid and stimulating work that it’s still with me after all these years.

Craig McDonald, author of the Hector Lassiter series

Many years ago, at the height of my book collecting period, my wife handled contact with Scorpion Press in the UK when I was ordering a signed and numbered edition of James Ellroy’s memoir, My Dark Places. That same Christmas, she surprised me with the far rarer lettered edition, of which only 15 were produced.

Kevin Stevens, author of Reach the Shining River

When I was eleven years old, my father gave me a beautifully illustrated leather-bound edition of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain. I read the novel then, have read it many times since, and it remains for me a touchstone of wisdom and great storytelling.

Les Edgerton, author of The Death of Tarpons

The best book gift I’ve ever received, I’ve received perhaps two dozen times. Same book. I have a pile of hardcover copies of Albert Camus’ The Stranger, my favorite book. Most of my friends know it’s my favorite book and so for years I keep receiving various copies of it. And, I love each and every one of them!

Fionnuala Brennan, author of The Painter’s Women

It is not easy to choose the best book present I ever received as what was best then I might not regard as the best now. However, I have chosen a book which I received many years ago because I remember it well and think many of its lessons are relevant today.  The book is Barbara Tuchman’s The March of Folly (Knopf, 1984).  She writes of what she terms ‘follies’, the paradoxes of history, from the Trojan War to Vietnam.  Tuchman (1917-1989) was not an academic historian and perhaps that is why her books, while they could be faulted for not being sufficiently rigorous, were widely read and won her two Pulitzer prizes.

To be continued…

Christmas Prize Draw!

November 27, 2017

BetimesBooksNow

Vote for your favourite Betimes Books cover for a chance to win a print copy of one of our books!

  1. The Prize Draw is open to people aged 18 and over who provide their email address by voting for their favourite cover and would be happy to provide their postal address if they win.
  2. Please select your favourite cover and send us your vote by email, to betimesbooks@gmail.com with “My favourite cover” as Subject.
  3. No purchase is necessary!
  4. Only one entry per person. Entries on behalf of another person will not be accepted and joint submissions are not allowed.
  5. Two winners will be chosen from the draw of votes: the person who was the first to vote for the most popular cover + one random draw.
  6. The winners will be notified by email on Monday, December 4, 2017.
  7. The prize will be sent to the winner by post.
  8. The prize is non-exchangeable and is not redeemable for cash.
  9. The first name and country of the winner will be announced on this blog and Betimes Books Twitter, Facebook and Instagram accounts. The winners are most welcome to share their prize in social media tagging Betimes Books.
  10. The closing date of the Prize Draw is 23:59, Dublin time, on the 3rd of December 2017.Votes received outside this time period will not be considered.

All our covers are designed by JT Lindroos.

If you wish to have a closer look at each cover, go to our Home page.

You can also see the back covers of the print editions on Amazon. We’ve provided the links below.

Fav. cover contest Dec2017-page-001Fav. cover contest Dec2017-page-002

List of Titles

  1. The Painter’s Women
  2. Permanent Fatal Error 
  3. The Red-Handed League
  4. The Death of Tarpons
  5. La Frontera
  6. The Last Island
  7. Central Park West Trilogy
  8. Dirty Pictures
  9. Silk for the Feed Dogs
  10. Francesca
  11. The Insider’s Guide to Betrayal
  12. Borderland Noir
  13. The Angel of the Streetlamps
  14. Killarney Blues
  15. The Starved Lover Sings
  16. Reach the Shining River
  17. In Love with Paris
  18. One True Sentence
  19. Forever’s Just Pretend
  20. Toros & Torsos
  21. The Great Pretender
  22. Roll the Credits
  23. The Running Kind
  24. Head Games
  25. Print the Legend
  26. Death in the Face
  27. Three Chords & the Truth

“The Death of Tarpons”: A journey into darkness

March 28, 2017

BetimesBooksNow

On the occasion of the new release of Les Edgerton’s debut novel, The Death of Tarpons, in paperback format by Betimes Books and in electronic format by Endeavour Press, we are taking a look back at what makes Edgerton’s first work of fiction so special. For something which, at first glance, seems so different from his later works, how does it fit so seamlessly in Edgerton’s body of work?

First published in 1996 as a hard cover edition, The Death of Tarpons stands out in Edgerton’s repertoire for how different in tone it is from his subsequent novels. To many, Edgerton is known as an acclaimed crime writer, but his most loyal fans will also know that he has never wanted to limit himself – or be limited – to one genre of writing: from short story collections like Gumbo Ya-Ya to young adult fiction such as Mirror, Mirror and plenty of non-fiction, Edgerton has explored writing in its many forms.

Consequently, it should come as no surprise that Edgerton’s first piece of writing is a touching coming-of-age story about a young teenage boy trying to build a better relationship with his father.

“Then, last year, I got this fantastic idea to do something totally on my own, in secret, that would show him once and for all I could do something mechanical. Manly. Then, he would love me and be proud of me and put his arm around me. I decided to build a boat. For him.”

Brazos River Bridge in 1958, Freeport, Texas

This sounds as far removed as possible from other works like The Rapist or Just Like That but, as one reviewer and fellow author has mentioned, the seeds of Edgerton’s later fiction can indeed be found here.

“Edgerton’s later novels have become Noir classics to many, and The Death of Tarpons hints at a moonless childhood that explains the author’s successful literary journeys into darkness.”

Jack Getze, Spinetingler Magazine, 2017

In The Death of Tarpons, young Corey certainly encounters many episodes of darkness. Nearly all of the personal relationships around him are afflicted with violent outbursts or psychological abuse: the regular beatings of his best friend, Destin, and his mother at the hands of his drunken father; the violent reprimands Corey endures from his own father as well as the emotional neglect he and his mother receive from Corey’s father – a neglect that has driven his mother to religious fanaticism.

“Every atom in my body was in fear. I had never seen such a look on his face as there was now, not even at his angriest. It was like the face of God Himself, the face the fire and brimstone preacher Mom listened to, conjured up, Sunday mornings.”

Thus, the darkness one would expect from Edgerton’s work is present in his debut; however, it is tempered by the sweet nature of its protagonist and the loving relationship Corey has with his Grandpa.

What allows Edgerton to write across different genres with such success is something that all his works have in common: an honesty that can only come from personal experience. Edgerton has described The Death of Tarpons as being “85% autobiographical” and as being a work which was long in the making, having started writing it at the age of fifteen. The setting of the novel – 1950s era Freeport, Texas – was a place where Edgerton spent part of his childhood and many characters are drawn from real life with, for example, the author’s own grandmother being just as successful and driven a businesswoman as the Grandma character featured in the novel. Just as Edgerton’s own experience as an ex-con gives a realistic edge to his crime fiction, the same truthfulness can be found in his debut.

Aerial view of downtown Freeport, Texas c.1955

“The Oyster Bar. The business that had sustained three generations, mine and my sister Doc’s, my parents, and my grandparents. The business that, along with the taxi cab company, my grandmother had created and ruled as her own private fiefdom. Not with some metaphoric iron hand, but with a very real Navy Colt long-barreled .45 on the dash of her taxi”.

The Tarpon Inn in 1954, Freeport, Texas

Honesty and credibility are what make Edgerton’s writings so distinctive and evocative. When reading The Death of Tarpons, one can really visualise what it was like being a young boy, just out on summer vacation with lots of great plans for how he was going to spend the holidays hanging out with his best friend, fishing with his Grandpa and getting closer to his dad.

1954 photograph of a teenage schoolboy taken for ‘The Luckiest Generation’ feature in LIFE Magazine

“All the way downtown, I used lawns, head down, alert for nettles and stickers. When I had to cross a street, leave the coolness of grass, I ran faster, landing on different parts of the soles of my feet. First-day-of-summer-vacation-tootsies were too white and thin-skinned for concrete baked at ninety-plus degrees.”

As with the rest of Edgerton’s work, the vividness of his characters and settings is a result of his personal knowledge of what it was like to be a young teenage boy growing up at this time in the American South. The credibility that comes from writing about places and situations one is familiar with is what gives The Death of Tarpons, as well as Edgerton’s other novels, a distinctive edge.

Tarpons cover with Hugh Seaver etching

New release: THE DEATH OF TARPONS by Les Edgerton

February 16, 2017

BetimesBooksNow

The Death of Tarpons was first published in 1996 and launched Les Edgerton’s reputation not only as an outstanding narrative talent, but as one of those writers able to break your heart with one sentence. Timeless.

tarponsfront“Edgerton’s first novel shines with wisdom.” —Publishers Weekly, 1996

“Facing his own battle with cancer, Corey John returns to Freeport, Texas, where he spent the summer of 1955 amid the turmoil of his dysfunctional family. Then fourteen, he had wanted nothing more than to go fishing and to please his abusive father. Yet through the tutelage of his loving, cancer-stricken grandfather, Corey crossed over into an adulthood in which he would not mimic his father’s example. Throughout this exceptional first novel, Edgerton uses fishing as an extended metaphor for life. Like a hooked tarpon that first lurks on the bottom before leaping high out of the water, life’s lows are followed by highs, and the successful angler must learn to cope with both extremes.” —Library Journal, 1996

“Edgerton’s later novels have become Noir classics to many, and The Death of Tarpons hints at a moonless childhood that explains the author’s successful literary journeys into darkness.” Jack Getze, Spinetingler Magazine, 2017

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AVAILABLE HERE:  viewBook.at/Tarpons_Edgerton_pb

Review of Craig McDonald’s DEATH IN THE FACE by Les Edgerton

October 23, 2015

BetimesBooksNow


Death in the FaceThis latest in Craig McDonald’s Hector Lassiter series—Death in the Face–is perhaps his finest. It’s my fervent hope that this isn’t the last in this wonderful series!

 

Like all the previous books in this series, McDonald sheds light on some of the most important literary figures of the past near-century on a personal level via the Hector Lassiter character and his adventures and that alone is worth the price of admission. For instance, I’ve never been a fan of Ian Fleming’s writing, but after experiencing this version, I confess I’m reevaluating my opinion of him. But, more important and irrespective of my opinion of Fleming’s literary acumen, this is a wonderful look at the writer from albeit a fictionalized account, and, like all the other literary figures who grace the pages of the Lassiter novels, delivers to the reader a delightful perspective on their lives not to be found elsewhere.

 

That McDonald is able to affect my own bias against Fleming is a telling thing and attests to the level of writing he is able to command. A remarkable read, a remarkable author and a remarkable portrait of an interesting literary figure. Highly recommended.

Les Edgerton

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DEATH IN THE FACE is available here